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Caliper Bolts and Slider Pins

Discussion in 'XJ Technical Chat' started by jag3, Jul 30, 2021.

  1. jag3

    jag3 Member

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    Can anti seize be used on the caliper slider pin bolt threads and caliper mounting bolts? Should I use loctite on any of the caliper bolts like the mounting bolts? What should the slider pins, caliper mounting bolts be torqued to? Any advice or tips on rebuilding them?
    Thanks
     
  2. Timbox

    Timbox Well-Known Member

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    Yes you can. Use anything that will not eat the aluminum or metal on there you want to loosen them up and get them out of there. After you get them out just clean them up really good to stop the reaction of any chemicals you may have used. I use BP blaster but almost anything will work. Keep working on those pins with the penetrating oil and work them a little with a long nose pliers or something that will get in there. Once they are out, clean them up, using a wire brush/wheel on them to clean them up and get any rust or pitting out of them. If they are too bad, you will need new ones.

    I am sure someone has a link here for a good rebuild thread. Good luck.
     
  3. Mechanic1978

    Mechanic1978 Active Member

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    Do not use anti seize on the slides for the caliper. antiseize is a mixture of small bits of metals, and is inteded for use where the bolt and threads are tightned once, and left alobne. if you use it on the slide end of these pins, it will slowly eat at the pins and make them extremly loos fitting.

    antisiez is ok on the threads only, and use a high temp caliper type grease on the actual slides.

    After you have them cleaned with a wire wheel or brush as @Timbox has suggested, clean out the caliper slide holes as well and re-lube them and insert the pins, noting any side to side "tweaking" movement. they should be fairlt tight on the side to side movement, but freely moving in and out.
     
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  4. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    +1

    I prefer using medium strength locktite on the caliper mounting bolts, even if you still have the lock washers (for some reason they seem to get lost off several of the bikes I've worked on before I've ever touched the bike). The Locktite will fill the air gap inside of the threads and prevent corrosion (which the anti-zeize does too) but also prevent the bolts from backing off until you want them too. Generally I reserve anti-seize for areas that get really hot, like the exhaust nuts.

    The caliper mounting bolts are torqued to 32 ft lbs
    The pad retaining bolt is torqued to snug (finger tight and a tad more. Don't forget the retaining clip).

    IF you haven't gotten a Haynes service manual, do so. It will save you from having to ask for torque values and waiting for the answer. The Yamaha manual is also available as a .pdf directly from Yamaha.

    Part of why you won't find many how-to threads about rebuilding brake calipers is because the service manual covers it very thoroughly.

    Some brake pads have undersized holes for the retaining pin. Just use a file to open the hole up.

    While your model does not have the anti-dive, or the remote master cylinder, they are a bit fiddly to bleed properly, so this thread may be of use to you.
    Bleeding the XJ750 Seca Front Brakes
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2021
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  5. Mechanic1978

    Mechanic1978 Active Member

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    I also only use locktite, but it is important to use the correct strength, as the red stuff can and has pulled aluminum thread right out. makes me UGHH!


    use the blue on any aluminum threads, it hold just as tight, but is "releasable"
     
  6. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    The red stuff is wonderful so long at it's used in areas where you can heat it to the 400ºF required for it to be removed.
    Basically only use it on things that might need to come apart once or twice every 30 years, but preferably on fasteners that won't ever need to come apart to service anything.

    And you can get away with not reapplying the blue every time a fastener is removed, but it's good practice to clean it off and reapply unless circumstances prevent that.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2021
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  7. XJ550H

    XJ550H Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I used anti-seize on my muffler of my Mac 41 5 years ago and I undid the muffler of the other day and it slid right off. Absolutely amazing.
     
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  8. lostboy

    lostboy Well-Known Member

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    Their is a new Loc Tite it is orange. It holds as tight as red but is removable as blue Loc Tite.
     
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  9. jag3

    jag3 Member

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    Thank you all for your help.
     
  10. jag3

    jag3 Member

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    Ok, dumb question. does the caliper piston go in with the solid end first so you see the open/hollow end when you look at the caliper?
     
  11. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

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    Yes!
     
  12. jag3

    jag3 Member

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    Thanks.
     
  13. jag3

    jag3 Member

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    Any suggestions on getting the piston in even? It keeps going in crooked. I put a socket in the open end that fits pretty close and pull it down with a c clamp but is not even.
     
  14. jag3

    jag3 Member

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    Less then 2mm but not straight. I've tried a few times and always comes out this way.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Toyobaru866

    Toyobaru866 Active Member

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    A socket with a c clamp might give a lot of downforce but it isn't very controllable, there will be more force on one side than the other causing the piston to do what it does in your case. I just used the plastic coated handlebar of a pair of pliers to put force on the edge of the piston, easier to correct.
     
  16. Franz

    Franz Well-Known Member

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    I use a piece of metal bar the roughly the width of the piston and 300mm long so I can push down evenly with both hands, works for me.
     
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  17. Toyobaru866

    Toyobaru866 Active Member

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    Same method, better tool!
     
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  18. XJ550H

    XJ550H Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    lube the seal and piston lightly , brake fluid will do the trick
     
  19. XJ550H

    XJ550H Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    these work well and are under 10$ most auto parts stores have them
    [​IMG]
    Lisle - LIS24400 - Caliper Piston Compressor Tool (ecstuning.com)

    you drop a socket into cup and use tool to push it in .
    I have an aluminim slug i use instead of a socke with edges rounded and smaller than cup
    you could use a piece of flat bar (brakepad with pad removed).
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2021
  20. 50gary

    50gary Active Member

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    Loctite 242 blue is good for things you will need to remove from time to time, medium hold 222 is low hold lavender color. I just finished a two stroke single and after test riding it "everything" seemed loose so out comes the 242 loctite.
    I use the made for disc brakes grease. My favorite grease is the Moly-bendium types, fairly expensive but a little goes a long way.
    Cheers, 50gary
     

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