1. Hello Guest. You have limited privileges and you can't "SEARCH" the forums. Please "Log In" or "Sign Up" for additional functionality. Click HERE to proceed.

Removing Mikuni float pins

Discussion in 'XJ Technical Chat' started by SQLGuy, Jun 27, 2009.

  1. SQLGuy

    SQLGuy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    Likes Received:
    172
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado USA
    Are these available somewhere?

    Not wanting to "punch" out the pins on my BS34's, I quickly made up these pliers. I took a pair of regular pliers, welded a bit to the inside jaws (to then grind down for a flat, rather than ridged, surface), and then used an angle grinder to cut the notch in the nose.

    They work like a charm. Just thought it's the type of thing that's probably available as a specialty tool, but, for the price of a few minutes and a pair of pliers I didn't need, I'm pretty happy with the results. Much better than a broken float pin tower :)

    Cheers,
    Paul
     

    Attached Files:

  2. johntc

    johntc Member

    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Fine idea!
    I'd like to think I won't dissassemble the carbs often enough to need one of these but I have enough pliers around I guess it would be a good investment even for a one-time use.
     
  3. stereomind

    stereomind Active Member

    Messages:
    1,440
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Pretty cool.
    One thing you could do is add a bracket to the jaw with the cutout that would support the other pillar when you press the hinge pin out... could even make it adjustable, so it would work with other models of carbs.... Someone _could_ make some money on a tool like that! :mrgreen:
     
  4. MiCarl

    MiCarl Active Member

    Messages:
    4,373
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Livonia, MI (Metro Detroit)
    Pretty slick. Like stereo said, supporting the other post would be good. You can generate enough force with that tool to snap it off.

    I usually find I can remove Mikuni float pins using an automatic center punch. Just press it against the end and the pin usually moves a bit with each firing of the punch.
     
  5. SQLGuy

    SQLGuy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    Likes Received:
    172
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado USA
    I see what you mean. When I designed these, I thought that the pins were held by the other end (they are actually held by a slightly wide shoulder near the head).

    Fortunately, they are not (at least in my case) held tightly enough for the force to be an issue for the other post. However, since these are the wide/narrow type of pliers, the "wide" setting can be used (and will be, in the future) for pressing out.

    Cheers,
    Paul
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Rice_Burnarr

    Rice_Burnarr Member

    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Near Philadelphia, PA
    Now that's a cool idea! :idea:

    Exactly. In theory, the pins are held in place only at the head end. You can see the slightly larger diameter section right under the head. The other end should be a slip fit. Assuming that it hasn't been glued in place by corrosion or varnish or hasn't been mangled by a previous owner or something like that.

    [​IMG]

    Your second pic with the jaws set on wide would be the right way to do it.

    [​IMG]

    One question. :?: On the side that pushes against the end of the pin tip... Is there a raised area that presses against the pin or can you only push the pin until the tip is flush with the post?

    Again, sweet idea!
     
  7. SQLGuy

    SQLGuy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    Likes Received:
    172
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado USA
    Flush with the post; which is plenty. You just need to push these out a little bit so you can grab the head something and pull it out.

    I also use these for pushing the pin back in, as in the first picture. I think having a raise bit would be detrimental when resinstalling the pin.

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  8. RickCoMatic

    RickCoMatic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,843
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Massachusetts, Billerica
    The picture looks scary to me!
    It looks like you are trying to break those Pillars.

    I hate stuck Float Pins.
    I usually stick a piece of Pine Shelf Stock in the Vice.
    Place the Post on the wood to prevent the Post from taking the Impact.
    Use a Carpenters "Finishing Nail Set Tool" to drive the Pin
    Strike it with the Head of a Small Ball-Peen Hammer sans Handle.
     
  9. SQLGuy

    SQLGuy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    Likes Received:
    172
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado USA
    Now, THAT, sounds scary... the hammer near the carb body part, plus the three hands needed to hold everything.

    I had pleny of control with this setup.
     
  10. xyxj650

    xyxj650 Member

    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Fergus Falls MN
    Very good idea! Does sound scary but the principle of it is great. That is the one thing I hated about trying to rebuild the Mikuni carbs. I was just talking to somebody about what a pain it is to get those pins out tonight. Next time I get into a set of those I will have to try that method. I have a set of xj650 turbo carbs I was going to rebuild but got stuck at that very same problem. Thanks for the Idea!
     
  11. Graytwhyte

    Graytwhyte New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Central IL
    Sorry to bring up an old post, but when using this tool would you decrease the change of breaking a post if you put a brace in between the two posts to prevent movement? Something sort of "C" shaped? I only ask because I have some pretty stiff pins to remove and don't want to snap a pillar. Thanks, Tim.
     
  12. xyxj650

    xyxj650 Member

    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Fergus Falls MN
    If you try this method be careful! One twist of your wrist or pull to hard on the pliers and you will be trying to find a new carb body. My buddy who is a machinest did not recommend removing the pins this way. He helped me and all he did was heat the carb body up and used a drill bit or small piece of metal the same diameter of the pin and tapped out the pin. Worked like a charm! I have broken posts trying to do it with a pliers on more than one occation. So if you try it be VERY careful!
     
  13. RickCoMatic

    RickCoMatic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,843
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Massachusetts, Billerica
    Grind the back-side of a small pair of Diagonals -- flat.

    Use the Tool to get a grip of the Hinge Pin on the Inside of the Head of the Hinge Pin.
    DO NOT PRY.
    Grab the Pin again and again ... working the wedge of the Tool to pull the Pin Head away from the Float Hinge Pillar.
     
  14. Graytwhyte

    Graytwhyte New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Central IL
    The head of the pin is flush with the float tower. They are very clean inside, but they won't budge even with trying heat and tapping them with a nail set.
     
  15. gaillarry

    gaillarry Member

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Northern Ontario, Canada
    I use a heat gun to warm up the post areas, then spray condensed air (used on computers) to spray the pin. Enough of the cold air spray will freeze the pin - you'll see frost. The pin comes out easy then.
     
  16. Graytwhyte

    Graytwhyte New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Central IL
    Thanks for the tip. I'll have to try that next time. I was able to get these out with some good solid tapping. Thanks to all who offered advice, Tim.
     
  17. RickCoMatic

    RickCoMatic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,843
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Massachusetts, Billerica
    If you buggered-up the Float Pin in any way while removing it, ... you'll find that the Shank of one of the larger-sized Pop Rivets makes an absolutely ideal substitute.

    And, ... it's about 1/zillionith of centimeter smaller in diameter so that it Floats rather than getting stuck-in the Pillar so the chance of damaging a Pillar removing it is eliminated.
     
  18. Graytwhyte

    Graytwhyte New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Central IL
    As a matter of fact I did, and was trying to think of a good substitute...so thanks a ton. I actually have some rivets that should work too. Thanks.
     

Share This Page